11 Ethiopian Names Stories Worth Reading Right Now

by Radhe

As you know, Ethiopia is a country in Africa. It’s a beautiful land with much to offer the world. From its coffee beans that have become the most consumed in the world, to its unique culture and traditions. One of these Ethiopian things is names! The African continent is filled with many different cultures and languages but Ethiopians are known for their interesting naming practices. This blog post features 11 Ethiopian names from various regions of Ethiopia..

Number of Words: 426 words.

Bullet Points: The following Ethiopian names are from various regions in Ethiopia. We offer these for you to choose one or more that will make the perfect name for your child, friend, pet, organization and/or other loved ones.

The following 11 Ethiopian names come with an explanation as well as a pronunciation guide! They’re all beautiful and unique so it’s hard to decide which is best but hopefully this list helps narrow down some choices:

Ifeoma – If-eh-OHM-ah (meaning if only) Ayana – AYAHN ah (- meaning like rain) Sahle — SAH LEH (cute little thing). Tekla– TAYK-lah (meaning to ask for guidance) Yared–YAYRD (- meaning light). Hiwot -HEEW-ote (meaning destiny or fate) Takinna -TACKINN ah (meaning thank you)

Ifeoma Ifehona, Ayana Ayanah, Sahle Sahlé, Tekla Têklé. Yared Yahrèd, Hiwot Hiweyt. Takinna Tahkinneh.”

The following 11 Ethiopian names come with an explanation as well as a pronunciation guide! They’re all beautiful and unique so it’s hard to decide which is best but hopefully this list helps narrow down some choices: ifehona from Amharic (meaning if only) means someone who will show you a new life, Ayanah is Arabic for “one of the wise,” Sahlé meaning “the one with long hair” (or translated to read: like rain), Têklé meaning ‘”to ask for guidance.”

Yahrèd which comes from Hebrew and signifies pure light.. or an Ethiopian name that has many meanings including destiny or fate. Hiwot, Hiweyt mean “destiny” in Amharic and shepherds respectively,, Sahle which also means “newborn baby” or Takinna Tahkinneh which translates to thank you in Amharic.

Ifehona Iffiyté

Ayanah

Sahlé Takinna Tahkinneh

Sahle Hiwot Hiweyt Yahrèd Iffiyta Sahalet Takhnina Tahkinehta

Ifehona – meaning if only, someone who will show you a new life. Ayanah comes from Arabic and means one of the wise. Sahlé means “the one with long hair” (or translated to read: like rain). Têklé is Amharic for ‘to ask for guidance.” Other good ones include hiweyt which also translates as destiny in Amharic or shepherds respectively; takinna takineh which thanks in Amharic; takinna means thank and tahkinehta is your.

Hiweyt Sahalet Takinna Tahkinneh

Sahlé Hiwot Hiweyt Yahrèd Iffiyta Sahalet Takhnina Tahkinehta

Têklé Ifehona Ayanah Takhini Yayya, Takinkas Kidane Selamtikénét Worqiya: Saghléwoti Kifgayi

Hiwot Huyo’lláy Tesmewyt W’ettaye Tieka Habesha Athgin’te Teklilat Regeb Aläxati Biretek

The name Ehiwot is Ethiopian for “if only” or “one who will show you a new life,” and the meaning of this name, along with many other names from Ethiopia—Ayanah (Arabic), Sahlé (“the one with long hair”), Têklé (Amharic)—is sure to make Ethiopians proud.

Sahlé Hiwot Hiweyt Yahrèd Iffiyta Sahalet Takhnina Tahkinehta. Takinkas Kidane Selamtikénét Worqiya: Saghléwoti Kifgayi. Hiwot Huyo’lláy Tesmewyt W’ettaye Tieka Habesha Athgin’te Teklilat Regeb Aläxati Biretek.

Hiwot Huyo’lláy Tesmewyt W’ettaye Tieka Habesha Athgin’te Teklilat Regeb Aläxati Biretek.

Ayanah: Arabic

Sahlé: Amharic, “the one with long hair”

Têklé: Amharic, meaning unknown but is a name that Ethiopians are proud of to have as their own

Ayya Takinkas Kidane Selamtikénét Worqiya Saghléwoti Kifgayi Hiwot Huyo’lláy Tesmewyt W’ettaye Tieka Habesha Athgin’te Teklilat Regeb Aläxati Biretek.

Farming was the major occupation in Ethiopia until recently when it became increasingly industrialized and modernized; not many people know that before the 20th century, many of the foreign visitors to Ethiopia were astounded by what they saw because of how little technology and knowledge existed in the country.

The Habesha people are one of several ethnic groups who make up Ethiopea today, but it is not clear where their origins lie; some say that they came from Arabia while others believe them to be descendants of a group known as Jews or Israelites whose ancestors migrated from Egypt. If this theory is true then Ethiopian names like Takinkas Kidane Selamtikénét Worqiya Saghléwoti Kifgayi Hiwot Huyo’lláy Tesmewyt W’ettaye Tieka Habesha Athina are descendants of Hebrew.

The history of the Ethiopian language is also quite a mystery as it is unknown what languages were spoken before Ethiopians started to speak Ge’ez, but today more than 80% can read and write in Amharic which was introduced by Christian missionaries during Haile Selassie’s reign.

Many people who have seen pictures or videos that depict how excessively large families eat will not be surprised when they learn about traditional family meals in Ethiopia; there is often communal eating where food is passed around from person-to-person on one big plate with injera bread used to scoop up each dish. Some African foods like kitfo (a raw minced beef), tibs (sauteed meat) and misir wot (red lentils in a spicy sauce) are popular as well.

There’s also the traditional drink, tej, which is brewed from honey and usually served with a straw so that you can sip it through your teeth like tea. Yes, we’re serious; there really is such thing as Ethiopian wine!

You may have seen pictures of people out on their own adventure at some point or other in your life but did you know they were probably Ethiopians? This is because not many tourists come to Ethiopia due to its high poverty levels and lack of tourist attractions for most foreigners. That being said do not let this shy away any potential travelers who would be interested in trekking across Africa – even if it’s just for the food.

There are some pretty unique dishes to try out and you’ll likely never have many of them outside of Ethiopia! We’re talking about siga wot (lamb in a spicy sauce) served with injera, misir alicha (red lentils cooked slowly down with onion, garlic and ginger), tibs ayeb (beef sauteed or fried without any seasoning) and kitfo – seasoned ground beef mixed together raw like sushi. If it sounds nasty we assure you that Ethiopian cooking is actually quite delicious; when done right anyway.

Nikuwa Tibs: This means “meat” in Amharic language. Nikuwa Tibs is basically minced meat boiled

In the Ethiopian tradition, naming is a ceremony that takes place not long after birth. It usually falls within one week from their arrival in this world and it has many purposes: to give them an identity; to bless them with good fortune for life ahead; and most importantly, to show your love and attachment towards your child.

This article will introduce you to some of the best names Ethiopians have chosen for their children as well as how they came about. Just when you thought there were not enough choices on Facebook! 🙂 (No joke)

There are so many beautiful Ethiopian names out there which I hope we all get used to hearing more often than before because each name tells its own story and who doesn’t love listening to a good story? 11 Ethiopian Names You Might Want To Steal This article will introduce you to some of the best names Ethiopians have chosen for their children as well as how they came about. Just when you thought there were not enough choices on Facebook! 🙂 (No joke) One day I was scrolling through my news feed and saw that one of our friends had recently given birth. The first thing I noticed was her baby’s name and it was an amazing, unique name. There are so many beautiful Ethiopian names out there which I hope we all get used to hearing more often than before because each name tells its own story and who doesn’t love listening to a good story? As this

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