11 Brilliant Tips for Haitian Names Newbies

by Radhe

Many people are unaware of the cultural significance and meaning behind Haitian names. For this reason, we have created a quick guide to provide you with everything you need to know about Haitian names. There are 11 tips that will help make your decision easier and ensure you choose the perfect name for your child!

Haitian names are often chosen to honor ancestors or things that the child’s parents value. The first name is typically a family surname while the second name, which has no gender, may be given in remembrance of a deceased relative. You can choose any two words as your baby’s middle name for many reasons: an emotional attachment to nature (like rain), an occupation you want them to have in their life (such as doctor), etc

Some Haitian Names and Meanings:

Esprit means spirit in French Creole. It is used mostly for males but its use varies depending on ethnic background. Esprit means “spirit” and comes originally from Latin Spiritus meaning “breath”. In Haiti it was

The Haitians are a proud people. They know their worth, and they respect themselves for the beauty of who they are as Haitian people.

And so we want to give you some pointers on how to choose your baby’s name while still staying true to this beautiful culture that is theirs too.

These 11 tips will help you get started in choosing names for your little one! Even if it isn’t Haitian-ness, these tips might be helpful anyways because every culture has naming conventions–so enjoy! 😉

Tip 01: Know when your child was born (if known) or what day he/she would have been born on by checking out the lunar calendar here . This will let you know which saint was honored on that day of the year.

I’d love to hear from you! Share your thoughts in the comments below, and feel free to reach out on social media as well by tweeting @HaitianMamaBlog with any other questions!

The blog post content can be summed up in bullet points:

There is no “correct” way of naming a Haitian baby but there are some guidelines for choosing their name based off what date they would have been born on (based off lunar calendar).

Choosing names should respect where you come from so it’s important to know this about yourself first.

Some popular saint days include March 17th which honors St. Josephine Bakhita, October 25th which honors St. Kevin, and January 27th which honors St. Louis Bertrand

Some popular names include:

Dakota for a girl (meaning “friend” in Lakota)

Ralphie for a boy (meaning “powerful warrior”) or Ralphina if it’s used as a girl name

Nelida for young girls who want to be strong like their grandmothers but not overly feminine so they could also use Nelly or Neldy with some people spelling it Linda. You can just ask your elders what the first letter of the saint day is that you were born on! This will let you know which saint was honored on that day of the year. I’d love to hear

There are no rules to naming conventions, so don’t worry about ‘doing it wrong.’

Name meanings vary from a saint’s name for naming boys or girls. Names like Marie (Mary) and Jean Baptiste (John the Baptist). You could also go with Ti Pierre (Peter) for your son if you wanted to honor one of Haiti’s most beloved figures who led them in their fight against slavery.

In Creole there is an idea that babies should have short names because they do not know how long they will live – perhaps as little as two years! So some parents might use something like Chouchounette meaning “little girl.” But on the other hand, many Haitian people believe children can grow up to live a long time.

Carlos is also an option if you want to use Creole because it means “man.” So many people might name their son after the country’s founding father, Toussaint L’Ouverture – or they could do something more contemporary and call him Jean Michel (John Paul).

For girls, some options are Marie Claire (Mary) for honoring Haiti’s patron saint; Renee/Renette meaning reborn in French but which can be spun into terms such as Reine evoking royalty with titles like Empress, Princess or Queen of Hearts depending on the girl who wants that kind of title. For example: Ti Jene LaRue would mean ‘Queen of Hearts’ and Ti Jene LeChevalier would mean ‘Queen of Knights’.

Some people might name their daughter after a city, such as Pétionville or Port au Prince. But that’s risky because there are so many places with the same name in Haiti.

There is also a slew of names we can take from our country’s flora: Rose, Jasmine, Gardenia.. There are some other possibilities for children who want to honor someone loved by Haitians – like Jean Jacques Dessalines (JEAN JAKE) which was chosen to replace his slave master name Breda; Charles Henri Nissage Saget/Nisaga meaning “son of Charlie”; Joseph Philippe

Remember that Haitian names are usually passed down from generation to generation.

The most popular name for boys is Elie, followed by Maximilien and Gedeon. The most popular girl’s names include Marie Laure (or just “Laure”), Amelie or just Amélie, and Yvese (sometimes spelled as Eve). A lot of the time people will have two middle names instead of one like in America. So your full name could be something like Toussaint Jean Pierre Philippe Mathieu Michel Élisabeth Thérèse Lina Joan Laurine Chantal Ines Jeannette Marguerite Véronique Hilda Edith Marcella Francisca Suzanne Alphonsine.

Some people also use the female names as a middle name for their son and male names for their daughter, like Toussaint Jean Pierre Philippe Mathieu Michel Élisabeth Thérèse Lina Joan Laurine Chantal Ines Jeannette Marguerite Véronique Hilda Edith Marcella Francisca Suzanne Alphonsine Joseph Philippe Breda Charles Henri Nissage Saget/Nisaga.

When in doubt or if you are unsure of your parents’ preference, there is no harm in asking them which style they prefer before deciding on what to go with! They will be happy to hear that you care enough about them to ask such a personal question.

Finally, it is not uncommon for Haitian children to have a shorter form of their first name as a nickname. For example: Jean Pierre can be called “Jean”, or Élisabeth would become “Bébé”. And if you’re child’s full name includes the letters L and M in any order (like Marguerite), they may often go by those initials instead–you’ll know when your kids are little!

The wrap up sentence should say something like this: That concludes our article on tips for naming baby Haitians. If you found these suggestions helpful please share with someone who might also benefit from them. Thanks so much for reading! Additional resources include..etc.

There is no need to write a conclusion to this post.

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This concludes our article on tips for naming baby Haitians. If you found these suggestions helpful please share with someone who might also benefit from them. Thanks so much for reading! Additional resources include..etc. Haitian Names are important for your child’s identity in Haiti. It can be difficult to choose a name with so many options available, but not impossible. There is no particular meaning behind the first part of an HNN (Haitian Name). The second part usually has meanings such as “reflection” or “sonny boy.” You may want to consult with elders near you who have had children before and ask them for their opinion on what they think would be appropriate names that reflect popular culture still present today among Haitians locally or abroad. They will also know better than anyone about whether any given baby’s namesake ancestor could cause problems when it comes time to naming him

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