10 Things I Wish I’d Known Before I Tried Filipino Names

I’m an American living in the Philippines, and I’ve been trying to learn Filipino names for a while now. It’s not like I had any problem pronouncing them at first – it’s just that people have so many different ways of saying their name! There are tons of variations on each syllable, which makes things really difficult. One day I started wondering what would happen if they all said their name exactly the same way; then it wouldn’t be such a pain in the neck! So I decided to do some research on how Filipinos pronounce their own names and found out 10 things about this topic that will help you too:

– Filipino names are usually short and easy to pronounce. They’re typically one syllable or two syllables maximum, which makes them really simple to remember!

– There’s not just one way of saying a word in the Philippines – there are many different dialects with all sorts of variations on how they sound like (you’ll hear words pronounced differently depending on where you go!). This is true for Filipinos as well; people will say their own name slightly different from each other even if it doesn’t seem that big of a difference at first glance. One thing I discovered was this: some Filipinos say my name “NAMEE” while others have been pronouncing it “NAH MAY”. It took me quite awhile to realize that these variations are totally normal.

– There’s a lot of emphasis on the first name in Filipino culture – it seems like everyone really wants to know how you got your name or what your parents were thinking when they gave you that particular one, and people will always ask for my full name even if I just introduce myself with my middle name (which is “Nameth”). This might be because Filipinos use their first names as nicknames so often; some people call me “Mae” instead of using my actual nickname (“May”)!

– It can sometimes take awhile getting used to hearing yourself referred to by someone else’s surname instead of your own: When I’m introduced formally, it feels weird being called “Mae Nameth” instead of just “May”.

– Filipinos often refer to each other by using their first name and the suffix “-ng,” which is a shortened version of “nanggaling” (means something like “from”) or “-pako,” which is short for pakikipagrelasyon, meaning that they’re friends. This sounds formal when translated into English (“I’m John’s friend.”), but it feels very casual in Filipino culture – you’ll hear people say things like, “Nanay at Tatay ng mga bata patuloy na nagsasalita ng Tagalog sa eskwela” ¦ It reminds me of how my grandparents would say, “Bila kayo nagsasalita ng kahit papaanong wika?”

– It’s a lot less common for people to refer to themselves by their surname and first name. I’ve been trying it lately just for the sake of variety (like when my sister calls me “May Nameth” instead of just “May”), but most Filipinos would tell you that this is reserved primarily for formal introductions or as an expression of formality in professional contexts.

* * * ¦ So what are some things I wish I’d known before learning Filipino names? These: – There isn’t one word equivalent to Mr., Mrs., Miss, or Ms. ¦ And because of this, Filipinos often forego forms of address that they might otherwise use in English.

* * * ¦ There’s no word for “please” or “thank you.” In lieu of these expressions, the first person singular pronoun is used: ¦Dumating ka na (“You’ve arrived), and then the verb will come afterwards.

– When a female friend refers to herself as “kame,” she means I (not me). It would be similar to calling oneself by one’s full name – not a common practice among friends who know each other well enough to call themselves with nicknames anyway! A male friend may say something like, “Kaming dalawa lang ang nakakita ng may-ari nito.” (“We’re the only ones who saw its owner.”)

* * * ¦ It’s not always polite to say “thank you” or “please” when someone does something for us. Filipinos are very aware of other people’s feelings and would rather avoid being thought as imposing by saying things that could be interpreted as a demand. In this case, it might be better to use the first person singular pronoun in place of these phrases so that they can take back control – think: I’m sorry; Thank You!

These small but significant nuances make life easier for newcomers like myself! If your Filipino friends show signs of confusion when you speak their language fluently, don’t be offended. They’re merely stunned at how quickly you’ve picked it up and they’ll be more than happy to help you out!

* * * ¦ For those of us who don’t want a first language, Filipino opens up new vistas in terms of conversation – not just with other Filipinos but also with the country’s many immigrants from India, China or Arab countries. The Philippines is one place where I finally felt that my English-speaking skills were as good as anyone else’s. It was an honor for me to learn Tagalog so congratulations on your new journey!

* * * ¦ If this sounds like something you’d enjoy learning yourself then start by reading some basic vocabulary words here:

* * * ¦ Filipino Language Basics for Beginners

You can also download a free Tagalog language pack from here:

“Tagalog Basic Phrases Pack.docx” (you need Microsoft Word to open it). The phrases are categorized by subject like greetings, introductions and other common topics of conversation but if you’re not sure how these words should be pronounced you’ll find some helpful YouTube videos in the first few pages of the document. If you want more information on learning this new language there’s some great beginners’ guides available online that cover everything from grammar to pronunciation and sentence structure – just make sure your computer is set up with a compatible browser otherwise they might not work properly! My favorite was the one I found on the Lonely Planet website – it’s called “Filipino: A Comprehensive Grammar” and is an absolute must-have for beginner learners.

“Tagalog Basic Phrases Pack.docx” (you need Microsoft Word to open it). The phrases are categorized by subject like greetings, introductions and other common topics of conversation but if you’re not sure how these words should be pronounced you’ll find some helpful YouTube videos in the first few pages of the document. If you want more information on learning this new language there’s some great beginners’ guides available online that cover everything from grammar to pronunciation and sentence structure – just make sure you have a dictionary handy! The Philippines is made up of over 700 islands, so it’s not surprising that there are many languages spoken in this country. Tagalog may be the most common and widely-spoken language but Filipino – which is based on Tagalog – can also be heard on some remote islands where people don’t speak any other languages. It might seem like an overwhelming task to learn more than one new language at a time, but with my advice below I’m confident you’ll find learning your first one much easier.. Number: 0. ** ** ** ** Methodology for Learning New Languages ** ** ** * * * * ** ** ** *. . .*. ..

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