10 Sins of Male Russian Names and How to Avoid Them

by Radhe

You might be a fan of Russian culture, or you might be thinking about traveling to Russia. Either way, it’s important to know what types of names are appropriate for males in the country and which ones should be avoided. In this article we’ll go over 10 types of male Russian names and why they’re bad. We’ll also give you suggestions on how to avoid these mistakes so that you can have a more authentic experience when visiting Russia!

Type 01: Vladimir Putin

Description: We’re going to start with the most obvious entry on this list. If you want a Russian name that will turn heads, there’s no better choice than the former president of Russia who is still in power today! Of course, if your last name is already “Putin,” then by all means keep it. But don’t give your son or daughter such an easily recognizable and politically fraught first name as well!

Avoid It By.. Giving Your Child Another First Name Instead The more generic options below are good choices for avoiding something so closely tied to current events like Vladimir Putin. You might also consider naming them after one of their relatives from before they became famous-you’ll have a family name with a story to tell.

In addition, if your surname is common in Russia such as Ivanov or Petrov–it would be wise not to give your son the same first and last names unless you want him being constantly confused by classmates who can’t differentiate between all the Ivans and Peters in his class! This will only cause problems when it comes time for college applications too, where he may need different forms of identification or to provide verification for transcripts.

Below are some of the most common male Russian names and why you might want to avoid them:

Vladimir Putin- If your name is Vladimir, there’s a good chance it was inspired by this guy! Even if that wasn’t the case, he’s still subjectively very famous in Russia as President so you’d be better off not naming him after him just because you like his first name. In addition, Vladmir means “ruler” so people will find out about how much power they have over their son from literally day one since he’ll always be called “Little Vlady.” Ivanova – This feminine version of Ivan can cause confusion when trying

Name

Ivan – sounds like “ya-vahn” which translates to ‘John’ in English. Avoid this name if you want your son to avoid being teased about his feminine sounding Russian name and instead stick with a more masculine moniker such as Dimitri, Konstantin or Mihail.

Fyodor – means either “gift of God” or it is derived from the Greek word for phallus (and let’s face it that’s not what you’re going for). Kuzma may be an alternative option because its meaning comes from one who has been born prematurely, but still had enough strength to survive. Boris on the other hand could translate into someone who was more manly when he was born.

Nikola – This variation of Nikolai is less popular than the original, but it still has a feminine sound to it and could cause your son some problems if he wants to be taken seriously as one tough guy. If you’re looking for something more masculine yet similar in spelling try Igor which means “a man servant”. It’s also worth mentioning that this name would make him too easy to confuse with Nicole!

Ivanov – may sound like ‘John-off’ or just plain old John off on his own so avoid at all costs! You can instead choose Kuzma again or maybe Konstantinov because its meaning translates into someone who was strong when they were born out of their mother (or womb).

Semyon – The perfect name for a baby boy destined to be the next Russian mafia boss, this masculine sounding and appearing moniker will cause your son no end of trouble with his future bosses. If you like it then try using Semen as an alternative which is derived from “seed” or semen. It can also act as a verb meaning ‘to sow’ so think about what kind of message that sends out when giving him such a name!

Koshkin – This may sound cool but if people start calling your newborn little one by their surname he’ll have some serious problems in school because they’re going to call him Koshka instead, which means cat (and not in the good way). You could avoid all

Naming your child in another language is a very personal decision, so it’s important to get this right. If you’re giving birth and don’t know any Russian names or what they mean, here are some things to avoid:

If the name ends with -vich or-evich (for example Vladimir Putin), then he will inevitably grow up wanting people call him Vladmir instead of his given patronymic first name; this may cause resentment later on. It also does not make much sense as one cannot shorten their own last name without dishonoring oneself.

To ensure that children won’t be teased for being unique when they’re older, choose a more conventional spelling like Nicholas instead of Nikolai because alliteration

The reason many Russian names are so difficult to pronounce is because they have a lot of different letters that don’t exist in English. For this post, we’ll be going over the following types: – Names with “o” at the end Note: The letter ‘o’ doesn’t even exist in most Eastern European languages

Names ending in “-sian.” Note: This refers to sounding like an Asian person or general lack thereof when it comes to articulation

Noun as first name (e.g., Ivanov)

Two words put together for one name (e.g., Igorchka)

Hard consonant clusters at the beginning of a word (i.e., Dmity, Shmigal)

Names that are too long (e.g., Svyatoslav Yershovich Vladmirsky Knyazevich)

Nouns as last names Note: This is actually a naming convention in Russia and other Eastern European cultures so it’s very difficult to avoid these types of names entirely but here are some guidelines to follow when considering whether or not you should use this type of name for your child

You want them to have an easier time growing up with their peers because they’ll be better accepted if their first name doesn’t sound like something from the World War II era? Choosing “Nicholas” instead of “Nikolai” will help with this

You want them to have an easier time getting a job because they’ll be better accepted if their first name doesn’t sound like something from the World War II era? Choosing “Nicholas” instead of “Nikolai” will help with this

Names that end in -ski or -sky (e.g., Nikolaski, Vladimirsky)

The following is not exhaustive and does not cover every possible type of male Russian names but these are the most common types you should try to avoid when naming your children: Igorchka, Dmity, Shmigal, Svyatoslav Yershovich Vladmirsky Knyazevich. It’s hard to find a good first and last name when you’re naming your son! Igorchka, Dmity, Shmigal, Svyatoslav Yershovich Vladmirsky Knyazevich. It’s hard to find a good first and last name when you’re naming your son! The following is not exhaustive and does not cover every possible type of male Russian names but these are the most common types you should try to avoid when naming your children: Igorchka, Dmity, Shmigal, Svyatoslav Yershovich Vladmirsky Knyazevich. It’s hard to find a good first and last name when you’re naming your son!

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